2
February

A Healthier Bed-and-Breakfast Breakfast

 

In our 19th year of innkeeping here at The Inn at Vaucluse Spring, we are re-thinking the idea of what it means to serve an indulgent B&B breakfast.  More and more of our guests are looking for a healthier breakfast.  The problem is that many health claims are diametrically opposed and there is no one menu which would strictly meet everyone’s idea of health.  The Paleo/Gluten-Free crowd is not going to be happy with what the Whole-Grain/Low Fat/Vegetarian folks want and vice versa.  Plus, we still have a lot of guests who just want to take a small vacation from these concerns and indulge themselves with their old way of eating for a couple of days.  Without becoming a short-order cook, what’s an innkeeper to do?

Our evolving approach is to follow The Middle Way (with apologies to the Buddha) and encourage our guests to relax a little bit about food.  In a world of Extreme-Everything, our choice is to be Extremely Balanced (can there can be such a thing?).  Our goal, as ever, is to serve delicious food, beautifully presented, that delightfully nourishes body and soul.  We will continue to accommodate allergies, food intolerances, and medically-imposed restrictions (as well as personal food preferences as best we can).

With the new Middle Way approach, we are considering calling our first course our Breakfast Appetizer or Starter so we have the leeway to serve something other that a breakfast bread.  The Appetizer/Starter may well be one of our traditional breakfast breads or muffins, or it might be a miniature version of one of our “sweet-day” breakfasts.  We just noticed the other morning how a breakfast strata filled with apples looked remarkably like an apple strudel; a smaller portion of this would make a lovely appetizer.  Last winter we got rave reviews on our Apple, Blueberry, and Carrot Muffins which (behind the scenes) we called the “stealth health” muffins because they contain a large portion of flaxseed meal and oat bran in addition to the goodness of apples, dried blueberries, carrots and walnuts.  We will be tinkering with the Breakfast Appetizer/Starter idea and getting guest feedback as we go.

The second course, Fruit for the Day, will continue to feature fruit, whether fresh or roasted.  We still believe perfectly ripe fruit, simply prepared, is an indulgence of which we don’t partake often enough.  It’s fun to try different combinations of fruits and sauces, and although there’s never been a lot of sugar in our sauces, there will now be even less.

The entre will be full of vegetables and protein, mostly in the form of eggs.  We’re still looking for a snappy name for this, so would love to hear your ideas.  We agree with Jefferson that meat is an excellent “condiment”, not the star of the show.  Eggs can be prepared in an infinite number of ways and they no longer seem to be considered the bad boys of the dietary world (after all those years of bad press!).  Fresh vegetables are as much an indulgence as fruit – in our daily rush we don’t always take the time to prepare them with care and imagination.  One of our favorite entrees right now is a Quinoa and Greens Breakfast Pie which we serve with a Prosciutto Crisp for a little crunch and ping of salt.  You might think there would be some hesitancy about the pie, but we’ve found that the overwhelming majority of guests really, really enjoy it.  Maybe it’s all those onions, leeks, red pepper flakes, and a great white cheddar.

So, we are looking to our guests for reactions, whether positive, negative, or indifferent.  Do you have an all-time favorite Vaucluse breakfast dish that you believe we should never abandon?  Any recipes of your own you would you like to share?  (We’ve gotten some fantastic recipes from guests over the years.)  Tell us about any new foods you have tried that you recommend.  Let’s hear from the silent majority who may think things should stay exactly the same.  Please email your thoughts directly to Neil.  She would love to hear from you.

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VAUCLUSE SPRING MIDDLE WAY RECIPES

Apple, Blueberry, and Carrot Muffins
aka The A-B-C “Stealth Health” Muffins
(12 muffins)

This is a substantial muffin with lots of super-food ingredients.  We like to serve them with cinnamon-sugar butter, but you could serve them plain.  They are good “keepers”, but the sooner you serve them after they come out of the oven, the better they will taste.  Ours come out just minutes before breakfast starts.

Whisk together dry ingredients and set aside:
1 cup all-purpose flour
½ cup flaxseed meal
½ cup oat bran
1 ½ tsp. baking soda
½ tsp. salt
¾ tsp. baking powder
1 ½ tsp. cinnamon

Whisk together and then add to the dry ingredients:
1 egg, lightly beaten
½ cup milk
2/3 cup brown sugar
¾ tsp. vanilla

Add in:
2 cups shredded carrots
1 large Granny Smith apple (unpeeled), shredded
1/3 cup dried blueberries
2/3 cup walnuts, toasted and chopped

Scoop batter with 1/3 cup measure into muffin tins that have been sprayed with vegetable oil spray.  Bake in 350 degree oven for 25 minutes or until muffins spring back when poked or toothpick comes out clean.

 

* * *

Quinoa and Greens Breakfast Pie

(serves 6)

We have experimented with several versions of this.  This is the current favorite, but you could certainly try other greens and cheeses depending on what you have available.  After nibbling on all the greens in the market, mustard greens are our current favorite for that extra zing of flavor. Sharp/tart cheeses are preferable; just think what a little splash of vinegar does for greens and you get the idea.  Go heavier on the red pepper if you like – we need to follow The Middle Way here at the inn.

½ cup quinoa (a mix of red and white looks especially nice)
1 cup water

1 small sweet onion, chopped medium fine
1 bunch leeks, white and light green parts, halved longways and cut into 1/8” semi-circles
1 bunch mustard greens, stemmed and coarse chopped
¼ tsp. red pepper flakes
½ cup grated Cabot White 3-Year Cheddar

5 oz. goat cheese, softened
½ tsp. salt
¼ tsp. cayenne pepper
4 eggs, room temp.

Cook quinoa according to package instructions.  Dump into large mixing bowl to cool.

Sauté onion in a little olive oil until soft.  Add leeks (make sure they are well washed) to the pan and continue until they are soft as well.  Dump into the quinoa bowl.  Sauté greens with red pepper flakes until wilted.  Add to the big bowl and toss until evenly distributed.  Add white cheddar to the bowl mixture and toss again.

Beat goat cheese until soft and fluffy.  Mix salt and pepper together with each other before adding to goat cheese.  Beat until blended.  Continue beating, adding eggs, and mix well.  Pour goat cheese mixture over the big-bowl ingredients and mix well.  Put into a 9” pie pan that has been sprayed with vegetable oil spray.

Bake in 350 degree oven about 45 minutes until edges begin to brown and eggs are set (knife comes out clean).  Allow to cool 10-15 minutes before serving.

 

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1
December

5 Steps to Great Gingerbread Houses

Vaucluse Gingerbread HousesGingerbread house construction requires nerves of steel, but is terrifically rewarding if you persevere.  Here are Neil’s top tips for minimizing the drama and avoiding pitfalls.

First, consider making just a façade of the house.  I really do like to make gingerbread houses, but we don’t have enough table-top space at the inn to display a three-dimensional house, let alone all six of the Vaucluse guest houses!  It was really a DUH!! moment when I realized we could replicate the facades of the houses and fit them all on one mantle top.

Second tip, when making a template for your dream house, make the window openings larger than what you want the finished windows to be.  Realize also that the thicker you leave the rolled out dough, the more it will puff when baked and the tinier your windows will be.  Windows, like eyes, are most appealing when wide open.

Third, roll out the dough onto a piece of parchment paper placed on a large cutting board.  Before cutting, pull the paper (with the dough on top of it) onto the back of a baking sheet.  Trust me, you do not want to crack your house trying to fish it out of the inside of a baking sheet with four spatulas and only two hands.  The year of the earthquake I used the excuse that the Manor House was cracked to make it look like the earthquake did it.

Fourth, if you choose to make caramelized sugar windows, get organized and be prepared to act fast.  I make templates for the window sizes and draw them out on plain aluminum foil, not oiled, not “release” foil (I’ve made both of those mistakes too).  Mix two scoops of white granulated sugar with a little cream of tartar and just enough water to wet the sugar in a stainless steel sauce pan.  Put on over medium low heat and stir until sugar is dissolved and starting to melt.  Do not stir after this point, but you can swirl the pan.  When the sugar starts to turn gold, quickly but carefully pour it onto the foil into the window shapes.  The sugar will continue to darken in the pan so the last windows will be noticeably darker than the first windows poured.  Which is kind of cool, actually.  If your windows look more like amoebas than rectangles, you can score them with a knife as they start to cool and then snap off the “amoeba arms” after the sugar hardens.  And eat them of course!

Royal icing piped onto back.

Place window on wet icing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A fifth and final tip is for the decorative icing.  Royal icing is a mixture of egg whites and powdered sugar.  Just make sure it is wet enough to flow easily because if it’s too dry it will end up popping off when it dries.  A bonus tip:  a #4 piping tip seems to be the happy medium for drawing lines.

So, go crazy this year and make a village!

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9
October

Fort Valley: The Alternative Scenic Drive

 

Fort Valley, and the George Washington National Forest that completely surrounds it, offer a beautiful alternative to the Shenandoah National Park and its Skyline Drive.  We often send our guests at The Inn at Vaucluse Spring to nearby Fort Valley when they are looking for “the road less travelled”.

Fort Valley is a proverbial “hidden valley”, cradled between the two ridges that make up the northern two-thirds of the Massanutten Range, which is located entirely within Virginia’s northern Shenandoah Valley.  There are only two main roads.  Route 678 (Fort Valley Road) runs roughly north/south the length of the valley.  Route 675 runs roughly east/west, crossing the Valley on the southern end.  You can leave the Valley by following 675 west through Edinburg Gap down into the town of Edinburg or follow 675 southeast into Luray.

Our recommendation is to enter Fort Valley from the north.  From route 55 midway between Strasburg and Front Royal, turn south at Waterlick onto route 678 (Fort Valley Road).  This road winds along Passage Creek between the bases of Signal Knob on the west and Buzzard Rock on the east.  Signal Knob offers great hiking.  Follow the link above to Hiking Upward’s description.  The orange blazed section of the Signal Knob trail is part of the Massanutten trail, a 71-mile loop that circles the valley along the ridge lines, not unlike the way the Appalachian Trail follows the crest of the Blue Ridge through the National Park.  Not exactly a day-hike!

While visiting Fort Valley, we definitely recommend visiting the Woodstock Tower.  At Detrick, about 15 miles into the valley, turn right onto route 758 (Woodstock Tower Road).  After a couple of miles, this will become a gravel road.  After another couple of miles on the gravel road you come to an unmarked T – turn left (you will still be on 758).  About a mile after the T you will come to the parking area for Woodstock Tower which is just a short hike away along the ridgeline.  For those of us used to hiking in the Shenandoah National Park on trails meticulously maintained by the PATC, this little trail may be a shock of trash and graffiti.  Get over it and do it anyway!  You won’t be sorry.

Looking west from Woodstock Tower

The views from the tower are outstanding.  To the west you will “overlook” the Seven Bends of the Shenandoah River where it lazily winds back and forth on itself.  Disclaimer:  with the leaves still on the trees, you will be doing good if you see more than one bend, but on a clear day I’m sure you can see West Virginia.  The trucks on I-81 look like teeny-tiny toys.  Looking to the east, you will see the Blue Ridge (and the national park) through a gap in the Massanutten Mountain.  So close and yet so far!

Looking east from Woodstock Tower

From the tower, we recommend you continue west on route 758 down the western face of the mountain into the town of Woodstock.  There will be a series of switch-backs, no guard rails, so just take your time.  Woodstock is a bustling little town with shops to explore and places to eat.  From there you can head back north to the inn along route 11, exploring the little towns on the way.

Alternatively, you can come retrace your route back down into Fort Valley from the tower and continue south on 678 to Fort Valley Ranch to go horseback riding (advance reservations recommended).  Or, continue on 678 to 758 on out of the valley to Luray to visit the Caverns.  In any event, you will have visited an unspoiled slice of Virginia that you would be happy to return to whether or not the national park is open.  Enjoy!

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2
October

Apple Butter Coffee Cake Recipe

Apple butter coffee cake is synonymous with fall at The Inn at Vaucluse Spring.  This past Saturday we had our first of the season, made with the local Stephens City Lions Club apple butter.  Lions Club members make it each year at Rinker Orchards, cooking it all day in copper kettles over an open applewood fire, with nothing added to fresh apples but sugar, water and their own secret blend of spices.  Our guests LOVE this coffee cake, so we thought we’d share our recipe.  We’ll never get around to publishing a cookbook, but if we did its title would be Too Good Not to Share!

Streusel mix:
3/4 cup brown sugar
1 tsp. cinnamon
2/3 cup chopped pecans

Dry mix:
2 cups flour
1 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. baking soda
1/4 tsp. salt
1 tsp. nutmeg

Cream together:
3/4 cup butter (1 1/2 sticks), room temperature
1 c. sugar

Add:
2 eggs, room temp
8 oz. sour cream

Apple butter mix:
2 egg whites
1/8 tsp. salt
1/2 cup apple butter

Combine streusel mix ingredients and set aside.  Mix dry ingredients together in a different bowl and set aside.  Butter a 9” x 13” Pyrex pan.  Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Cream butter and sugar with KitchenAid until light and fluffy.  Add the eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition.  Add the sour cream and beat until incorporated.  Add dry ingredients and mix until just incorporated.

In a separate bowl, whip egg whites with salt until stiff.  Fold in apple butter until evenly incorporated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cover bottom of baking dish with thin layer of batter.  Sprinkle 1/4 cup streusel over top.  Spread apple butter mix evenly over the streusel.

 

Spoon remaining batter over apple butter mix as evenly as possible to cover.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sprinkle remaining streusel evenly over top. 

 

Bake in 350 degree oven for 40-45 minutes until toothpick inserted in middle comes out clean.  Place on wire rack to cool before cutting into 15 to 18 portions.  Enjoy!

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6
September

Apple Harvest Time in the Shenandoah Valley

No visit to the Valley in September or October is complete without an expedition in search of apples.  It’s the perfect excuse to travel the back roads and see some countryside.  Having lived here since 1995, we are happy to recommend our favorite spots to get apples.  Each orchard has its own personality but all have one thing in common:  they are all family businesses, as in fourth or fifth generation orchardists.  Not something you see very often.

Rinker OrchardRinker Orchards is a classic pick-your-own (PYO) operation.  Started in 1972, one of the first in Virginia, they are now seeing the return of a third generation of apple pickers.  We have guests at the inn who remember coming out as children with their families every fall to pick at Rinkers.  There are large bins of pre-picked apples, but picking from the tree really takes no longer that picking from the bin.  You can probably get all the apples you want from just a few trees, so it’s not like you are wandering around the whole orchard.  Things to know:

  • PYO is available Friday through Monday only.
  • The minimum purchase is a bushel, although it’s fine to mix together different types of apples.
  • Apple butter will be made on site by the Stephens City Lion’s Club on September 14, 21, and 28.  Just personal opinion, but Neil says this is the best of the local apple butters.
  • Rinkers is maybe best known now for their cider, available at the orchard but also at other markets, including the local Martins Food Store.  Made only from fresh fruit and flash pasteurized, we serve it at the inn until the supply vanishes, along about New Years.

 

Marker-Miller Orchard is a PYO operation that has grown into a destination all its own.  There are 20 varieties of apples, 12 of which you can pick from the trees yourself.  There’s a full bakery onsite, producing lots of treats including their famous cider donuts.  The mountain view from the front porch rockers is the best of the local orchards and there is a wide variety of local products for sale.  Things to know:

  • The market is open daily in September and October.
  • Their Fall Farm Festival in September 28 and 29, featuring live music from 1 to 3.
  • Their Apple Harvest Festival is October 12 and 13.

 

Richard’s Fruit Market has a nice assortment of already picked apples, and mixing the different types is encouraged.  You’re quite likely to meet at least a couple of generations of Richards while visiting.  Listen to their banter, and get a little peep into life in the Valley while you are at it.  The apples are sorted and graded right there at the market, and there’s almost always a small collection of “freak” apples or vegetables that have caught someone’s eye.  A little off the subject of apples, Neil is a huge fan of their home-canned jars of Tomato Mix, which is the perfect starter for a quick midweek meal at home.  Exactly what you would can if you had the time to do it yourself.  Things to know:

  • The market is open daily.
  • Their Apple Festival is Saturday October 19.
  • Richards is host to the Virginia State Gourd Festival November 2 and 3 (don’t giggle – there are fascinating things to be seen, and purchased).

 

 

Woodbine Farm Market in Lebanon Church offers 16 varieties of apples including at least two heritage varieties not found at the other markets – Spitzenberg and Ash Mead Kernal.  The drive from the inn down Middle Road is lovely, and if you will be heading west on Route 55 to go hiking or touring in West Virginia, you can pick up some great pork or chicken barbeque there as well as a tasty dessert for a picnic.  We’re definitely going back in October to try the Spitzenbergs.  Open daily.

Long before Fresh-and-Local became a “trend”, these Shenandoah Valley families were out making the best of our sweet limestone soil by planting orchards.  We’ve developed a great affection for them and respect for their hard work.  We hope you’ll enjoy visiting them.

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6
June

American Impressionism Comes to Winchester

American Impressionism:  The Lure of the Artists’ Colony, on exhibit at the Museum of the Shenandoah Valley in Winchester, Virginia, now through August 4, 2013, follows the Golden Age of American impressionism through several artists’ colonies from the 1880s through the 1940s.  Paintings are grouped by artist colony, from Cos Cob and Old Lyme in Connecticut to Taos, New Mexico and several in California.

Winchester is the first stop for this travelling exhibit from the collection of Pennsylvania’s Reading Public Museum.  As quoted on the Winchester museum’s website, “‘The exhibition provides a rare opportunity to see such a wide variety of approaches to impressionism in America,’ said Scott Schweigert, The Reading Public Museum’s Curator of Art and Civilization.   ‘I think visitors will be delightfully surprised by the tremendous scope and depth of the Museum’s collection in this area.’”

"Winter in the Valley"My favorite may well have been the Edward Willis Redfield (of the New Hope, Pennsylvania Colony) rendition of Winter in the Valley, maybe because it reminds me of Jeff Chumley’s painting of the shuttered Vaucluse in the snow all those many years ago.  It was a pleasure to be able to sit quietly for a few moments and enter into another world.

New visitors to the Museum of the Shenandoah Valley will want to see its permanent collections for a great introduction to the Shenandoah Valley, its people, history and decorative arts.  Although the historic Glen Burnie house is currently closed for renovation, a visit to the museum’s Founder’s Gallery exhibit, Moveable Feasts:  Entertaining at Glen Burnie, gives a glimpse into the world of Glen Burnie’s last owner and his partner.  The exhibit takes a light hearted look at everything from brunch on the patio (with tame quail and a squirrel) to formal-dress cocktails in the Pink Pavilion (with the guests wearing Planet-of-the-Apes type masks).  The gardens and grounds are also open for touring and well worth a visit.

 

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18
March

Antiquing in Front Royal

Arleen Brown Antiques

Who knew what a positive effect eBay and facebook could have for small storefront antique shops.  A recent visit to Arleen Brown Antiques and Beau Monde Boutique in nearby Front Royal, Virginia, uncovered two shops who are able to keep an amazing inventory of fascinating things because a large chunk of their sales is made all over the globe through the internet.  All the better for those of us who can walk in the front door and see a cornucopia of goodies first hand!

Arleen with Cloche

The savvy owners of these two shops are clearly a mutual admiration society, most interestingly because they make such a study in contrasts.  Arleen Narron, whom Barry and I have known since our old days of shopping at Law’s Auction in Manassas, has been in the business for 34 years.  Several of the prints hanging at the Inn were purchased from her years ago, and I just saw two more that I really would like to have.  Her current shop, Arleen Brown Antiques on Main Street in Front Royal, has fabulous accessories, fine art and vintage jewelry.

Coco Chanel and Karl Lagerfeld Jewelry

Classic Chanel and Lagerfeld Jewelry

I was particularly intrigued with Arleen’s collection of Coco Chanel and Karl Lagerfeld jewelry, classic!  Check out her facebook page to get a flavor of what she carries.  Closed on Tuesdays.

 

 

 

 

 

Beau Monde Boutique

Beau Monde Boutique

Cassandra Eckert, proprietor of Beau Monde Boutique, has only been in the antique business for about four years, starting out online with eBay.  She opened her shop on Main Street, just a few doors down from Arleen Brown Antiques, in August 2012.  Although newly opened, it gives the appearance of containing a long lifetime of collecting.

 

 

 

Beau Monde vignette

Vignette at Beau Monde

This is not one of those spacious shops where someone has done the work of putting together a whole grouping of coordinated items that you might scoop up and take home.  You need to spend some time looking and thinking, which truly is the fun of antiquing.  The mood is eclectic, exotic, even a little edgey (in a good way), a study in contrasts.  See Cassandra’s eBaycollection too.  Open daily.

 

 

Beau Monde Beauty

Beau Monde Beauty

Have you been to either of these shops?  Buy anything?

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18
May

Strawberry Balsamic Freezer Jam

Local strawberries are in!  Yay!!  But what to do when your loving husband brings you a flat of berries (8 quarts) rather than the 4 quarts you needed?  And the “shelf life” of these berries is maybe 8 hours.  Make freezer jam of course.

And what do you do when the weather has not been hot enough to bring out that full strawberry flavor you remember as a child?  Add a little balsamic vinegar of course.

With plenty of berries to experiment with, I made 3 batches according to the directions for strawberry freezer jam using Ball’s Instant Pectin.  The first batch was the “control”, just to see if adding the vinegar to the other batches had any effect on the jelling.  The vinegar batches were no soupier than the no-vinegar batch.  (Freezer jam by its nature tends to be soupier than cooked jams.)

I added 1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar to one batch and 2 teaspoons to the other.  The 1-teaspoon batch tasted better than the control batch–more depth of flavor, and you couldn’t taste the vinegar until the very end.  The vinegar just enhanced the flavor.  In the 2-teaspoon batch, the flavor was still great, but the vinegar was a little more prominent.  It’s amazing what a difference such a small amount made.

We are currently serving the 1-teaspoon batch with rhubarb bread at breakfast.  I think the 2-teaspoon batch would be a great sauce over ice cream and pound cake.  What a treat to have either version stashed in the freezer.

Recipes that I saw online called for reducing the basamic before adding, but I really didn’t want that intense a flavor for breakfast.  What do you think?  Have you played around with freezer jams?  Any good combinations we should try?

 

 

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11
April

Getting the Most from your Virginia Winery Visit

We are asking the folks “on the other side of the counter” for their thoughts on how our guests can get the most from their wine tasting experience when visiting local wineries.

Guy at Sunset Hills Vineyard says the most important thing is to keep an open mind.  Maybe you know that you don’t like red (or white) wines or sweet (or dry) wines.  Maybe you would rather just skip tasting wines that you know you won’t like.

You can be a “skipper”, of course, if your only goal is to sample wines to see if you want to purchase any to enjoy later.  Nothing wrong with that.

But Virginia wines may surprise you.  Because of the unique terroir of the vineyards and the vagaries of Virginia’s weather in any given growing cycle, a particular varietal you think you dislike may, here, be unlike any you have tasted from other areas.

Why not take advantage of the opportunity to taste the difference Virginia makes.

If you are the type who likes to research things before you go, check out Swirl, Sip, Snark, a blog devoted to one couple’s visits to Virginia wineries.  In their words, SSS is “sort of a cross between a serious wine blog and a vaudeville act.”

(WARNING!  It is entirely too easy to fritter away an excessive amount of time on the SSS blog vicariously visiting wineries.)

If you are the type who likes to make up your own mind, read SSS after your visit to compare notes with them.  Even their snarkiest reviews look for (and find) something positive in each experience.

Which reinforces Guy’s point to always “keep an open mind”.

What’s your advice for winery visitors?

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10
March

Neil’s Take on Contemporary American Cuisine

For those of us of a certain age, modern menus (including ours), can look a little strange.  And the plating can be fascinating, even dramatic, but maybe a little confusing.  Here’s a brief guide for (and by) the clueless.

Menu writing has evolved as dining has evolved.  “Back in the day,” as we oldsters say, a menu would list a classic dish which you knew (or were expected to know) how it was prepared and what the primary ingredients were.

Well, Chef Adam is bringing us up to date.  Now, on our Saturday night menu, you might see:

Scallop, Corn Purée, Chorizo, Chili Oil,
Confit Tomato, Leeks, Machê, Plantain Chips

So, you might wonder, “What is this, a list of ingredients?”  Well no, the items listed for each dish reflect the primary flavor components.  Adam strategically places these components on the plate so that each bite you take will be a somewhat different combination of flavors and textures than the bite before or the bite after.

Unless, of course, you are the type who stirs up all those intersting components of your soup, getting the same effect you got when you mixed all your finger paints together in kindergarten.  Adam says, since you don’t tell him how to cook it, he’s not going to tell you how to eat it.  Neil says, pay attention to each exquisite bite and savor the moment!

You can see recent menus posted on our website to get an idea of what is in store for your dining pleasure on Friday and Saturday evenings.  We also have a collection of past menus here at the inn that are fun to leaf through.

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